Learn . Laugh . Eat

Vietnamese Scotch Eggs

Prep:

Cook:

School of Wok delivers another Asian-inspired twist, this time on a British classic. This pork mix started life as the base mixture used to create patties for a delicious Bahn Mi, but the fresh and punchy flavours work great as a Vietnamese-inspired take on the traditional scotch egg.

2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 stalks lemongrass, roughly chopped

2 spring onions, chopped

2 tsp palm sugar

1 tbsp light soy sauce

250g pork mince

12 quails egg

1 beaten hens egg, beaten

100g plain flour

100g panko bread crumbs

450ml vegetable oil for frying

Using a mortar and pestle, pound the lemongrass, garlic and spring onion into a paste. Next, add the palm sugar and soy sauce and mix well. Tip the wet mixture into a large bowl, add in the pork mince, and mix well either with your hands or a wooden spoon until well combined. Reserve for later.

Place the 12 quails eggs into a small pan with enough water to cover the eggs. Slowly bring the water to the boil, remove immediately from the heat and let sit for 3 minutes. Remove the eggs from the water and run under a cold tap until they are cool enough to handle, then carefully peel them.

Now it’s time to form your ‘eggs’; take a heaped spoonful of the pork mince and pat it flat out on a board, place a peeled quails egg in the centre and, using a small palette knife if necessary to help, wrap the pork around the egg, taking care to create as thin a layer of mince as possible, without exposing any of the egg.

Next, roll the ball in a small dish of plain flour, then the beaten hens egg and then coat in the panko bread crumbs. Repeat so all the eggs are coated in a layer of pork, flour, beaten egg and bread crumbs.

Deep fry the eggs 3 at a time in a large wok, saucepan or deep fat frier. Take note, in order for the pork to cook thoroughly, the temperature of the oil cannot be lowered too much, so small batches are key.

Once fried, drain off any excess oil on a stack of kitchen paper.

Serve hot, room temperature or cold, depending on preferences.


2 cloves garlic, crushed

2 stalks lemongrass, roughly chopped

2 spring onions, chopped

2 tsp palm sugar

1 tbsp light soy sauce

250g pork mince

12 quails egg

1 beaten hens egg, beaten

100g plain flour

100g panko bread crumbs

450ml vegetable oil for frying


Using a mortar and pestle, pound the lemongrass, garlic and spring onion into a paste. Next, add the palm sugar and soy sauce and mix well. Tip the wet mixture into a large bowl, add in the pork mince, and mix well either with your hands or a wooden spoon until well combined. Reserve for later.

Place the 12 quails eggs into a small pan with enough water to cover the eggs. Slowly bring the water to the boil, remove immediately from the heat and let sit for 3 minutes. Remove the eggs from the water and run under a cold tap until they are cool enough to handle, then carefully peel them.

Now it’s time to form your ‘eggs’; take a heaped spoonful of the pork mince and pat it flat out on a board, place a peeled quails egg in the centre and, using a small palette knife if necessary to help, wrap the pork around the egg, taking care to create as thin a layer of mince as possible, without exposing any of the egg.

Next, roll the ball in a small dish of plain flour, then the beaten hens egg and then coat in the panko bread crumbs. Repeat so all the eggs are coated in a layer of pork, flour, beaten egg and bread crumbs.

Deep fry the eggs 3 at a time in a large wok, saucepan or deep fat frier. Take note, in order for the pork to cook thoroughly, the temperature of the oil cannot be lowered too much, so small batches are key.

Once fried, drain off any excess oil on a stack of kitchen paper.

Serve hot, room temperature or cold, depending on preferences.

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